Court filing, USA v Todd Markley The handwritten notecard found in Todd Markley‘s safe. Court filing, USA v Todd Markley

On April 12, 2012, a postman carrying a package containing two DVDs of child pornography — one titled Curious Boys — walked up to a modest home in Export, Pa., some 30 minutes east of Pittsburgh, and rang the bell. A forty-something man emerged, signed for the offered package and retreated back inside. The man was Todd Markley, a former church youth worker who hadn’t done much to mask his purchase; indeed, Markley had paid $54.95 for the videos with a personal check and signed his own name, then filled out the order form with preprinted address stickers listing his correct home address. He also hadn’t been discriminating about how he obtained his videos. Rather than seeking out vetted sources, Markley had simply responded to an ad from a company called “CVI” that had arrived in the mail.

The ad had been produced by one Brian Bone, which might sound like some sort of pseudonym but which was in fact the name of a US Postal Inspector running an undercover sting operation. Bone had helped bring down an LA distributor of child pornography back in 2006 and, as part of that investigation, had uncovered the company’s sales database. On it were a host of names, including Todd Markley‘s — a repeat customer who had allegedly ordered 21 child pornography videos between 2003-2006. After shutting down the LA company, Bone in 2011 finally turned his attention to reeling in those customers in the company database, provided they still showed interest in obtaining such material. Markley proved an easy fish to hook, requesting a catalog from CVI and soon ordering videos right to his home.

If Arrested for Child Porn, Don’t Email Threats to a Federal Agent | DFI News.

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