Category Archives: GPS

SYTECH Assisted Case – Utilising Advanced Phone Forensics – Alfie Sullock: Babysitter boyfriend guilty of manslaughter

Alfie Sullock: Babysitter boyfriend guilty of manslaughter

 

A man who killed his girlfriend’s six-week-old baby by battering him with a shoe and plastic bottle has been found guilty of manslaughter.

Michael Pearce, 33, was looking after Alfie Sullock, from Cardiff, for two hours while the baby’s mother had her first night out following the birth.

Magistrate’s son Pearce, of Nelson, Caerphilly county, was cleared of murder at Newport Crown Court.

Mother Donna Sullock said she was “disappointed” with the verdict.

Alfie had extensive brain damage after the attack and died four days later.

As she wept on the steps of the court after the verdict, the 29-year-old said: “We are disappointed at today’s verdict but satisfied that he will still go to prison for what he’s done.

“Whatever sentence he will get, it will never be long enough for taking Alfie’s life away.

“We have been through a year of absolute hell.”

Donna Sullock said she had been through a year of ‘absolute hell’

Judge Mr Justice Baker thanked the jury, and added: “It is never easy in a case like this.”

Throughout his three-week trial, father-of-one Pearce denied murder and manslaughter.

He said he did not do anything to hurt Alfie, who he killed at his home in August 2013.

Ms Sullock had left Alfie, born on 6 July 2013, with Pearce, who she was in a relationship with at the time, to enjoy her first night out since giving birth.

The pair had become friends while she was six months pregnant, and later became a couple.

Although the court was told Pearce began to display “obsessive behaviour” towards Ms Sullock – and even asked her to give him a child just weeks into their relationship.

Pearce claimed he did not hurt Alfie and gave him mouth-to-mouth resuscitation

‘Trust me’

On 16 August, Ms Sullock travelled from her home in Cardiff to Pearce’s house in Nelson, Caerphilly county, to stay the weekend. Pearce suggested she go out with his friend’s girlfriend for a “girly night out”.

That night Pearce had drunk five pints of beer – four of them in 45 minutes.

He then returned home and looked after Alfie while Ms Sullock got ready.

She told the court her baby was fine when she left Pearce’s house.

But less than half-an-hour into her night out, the pair exchanged a series of text messages.

Pearce maintained Alfie was fine but shortly after he sent a text saying, “you can trust me” he dialled 999 and called Ms Sullock to say Alfie had stopped breathing and was being taken to Prince Charles Hospital.

Alfie was transferred to the University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff, where four days later – on 20 August – life support was withdrawn and he died.

A post mortem examination showed Alfie died of blunt trauma injury and extensive bleeding into the brain.

After deliberating for 35 hours and 56 minutes, the jury decided by a majority verdict of 10-2 that Pearce was guilty of manslaughter but cleared him of murder.

Donna Sullock was enjoying her first night out since Alfie’s birth when he was battered by Pearce

Following the verdict Gwent Police’s Ch Insp Leanne Brustad said: “Innocent baby Alfie Sullock was killed at just six weeks old.

“His mother Donna, and Alfie’s extended family, have sat throughout this trial listening to shocking evidence about the nature of his death.

“During an extremely emotional and upsetting time they have handled themselves with great dignity and composure and our thoughts remain with them.”

Pearce will be sentenced on Wednesday.

 

BBC News – Alfie Sullock: Babysitter boyfriend guilty of manslaughter.

SYTECH Assisted Case – Mobile Phone Forensics including Chip-Off used – Ruthless commuter belt drugs kingpins murdered young hoodlum who sold shotgun they had given him to kill rival

Ruthless commuter belt drugs kingpins murdered young hoodlum who sold shotgun they had given him to kill rival

 

Former football coach Zain Sailsman, 19, became dealer to fund his habit

Charles Beadell and Ricky Jervis, both 22, raked in around £30,000-a-month selling heroin and crack cocaine in Macclesfield, Cheshire

After he double crossed them, they lured Sailsman to remote woodlands 

Beadell stabbed Sailsman in the back, cutting into his spine 

Beadell and Jervis sentenced to life and told they must serve 27 years

Two young hoodlums who resorted to murder as part of a ruthless plan to build a drugs empire in the heart of the Middle England commuter belt were each jailed for life yesterday.

 

Charles Beadell and Ricky Jervis, both 22, begun a turf war to terrorise locals into joining their gang after they raked in around £30,000-a-month from peddling heroin and crack cocaine in the silk market town of Macclesfield in Cheshire.

But when former football coach Zain Sailsman, 19, double crossed the pair and sold a shotgun which had been used in a gangland shooting, Beadell and Jervis lured the teenager to woodlands and stabbed him in the back as a ‘punishment’.

Ricky Jervis arrives at Chester Crown Court

Charles Beadell shows his contempt for the law

Murderers: Drug dealers Ricky Jervis (left) and Charles Beadell (right) arrive at Chester Crown Court

As the teenager staggered away dying from his wounds, Beadell who carried out the stabbing told Jervis: ‘The kid thinks he can treat me like a muppet.’

Keep-fit fanatic Sailsman who was nicknamed ‘Black Magic’ climbed over a fence and tried to flee up a country lane but collapsed. Passing motorists tried to help him but he never regained consciousness. It emerged the knife cut into the spine and severed a major blood vessel leading to his heart.

Police investigating the murder later bugged a canal barge and secretly taped another local villain William Dale laughing about Beadell and the victim saying: ‘Horrible little f***** that Charlie is. You know what I mean, cut his fingers off, cut his toes off, cut his ear off – anything but kill the guy.’

Charles Beadell (left) was convicted of the murder of 19-year-old Zain Sailsman who a  post mortem examination revealed had died from a single stab wound

Charles Beadell (left) was convicted of the murder of 19-year-old Zain Sailsman who a post mortem examination revealed had died from a single stab wound

At Chester Crown Court, Beadell, from Macclesfield and Jervis, 22, from Congleton were both convicted of murder after a six-week trial and were each ordered to serve a minimum of 27 years.

Zain Sailsman was a drug dealer who was murdered when he double-crossed other dealers

Zain Sailsman was a drug dealer who was murdered when he double-crossed other dealers

Jervis tried to spit at police but missed and soiled the glass of the dock.

Beadell’s girlfriend Julia Howard, 36, a student forensic psychologist, who acted as the getaway driver was cleared of murder but convicted of perverting the course of justice and was jailed for three years.

Dale, 25, was jailed for 14 years after he admitted drugs and firearms offences.

Passing sentence the judge Mr Justice Robert Jay said: ‘This case, as countless previous cases have done, highlights in cruel and graphic terms the grief, the misery, the human and social costs, of drug addiction and drug dealing.

‘I have no doubt that the motive of both of you was to punish Zain Sailsman for what you felt was his cheeky attitude over time.

‘You Beadell, knew that the gun had gone – you Jervis at the very least believed that it was highly likely that it had gone, and were of a mind to punish Zain Sailsman.’

The jury was told Macclesfield’s drugs rackets had been orchestrated by Dale from his barge which was moored between Congleton and Alsagar.

Dale was said to buy drugs in bulk and sell them on through a network of lower level dealers in towns across Cheshire and Staffordshire and would hire Beadell and Jervis.

Charles Beadell was sentenced to life imprisonment with a recommendation he serves a minimum of 27 years for the murder of  19-year-old Zain Sailsman

Charles Beadell was sentenced to life imprisonment with a recommendation he serves a minimum of 27 years for the murder of  19-year-old Zain Sailsman

But Beadell and Jervis wanted to take greater control of the Macclesfield drugs market after hoodlums from Manchester tried to move in on the area. Beadell himself was selling narcotics purely to make money for pure ‘greed’ and was turning over up to £1,000 a day on his own and would get his girlfriend to drive him around and was ‘fuming’ that outsiders were trying to grab his turf.

He eventually recruited Sailsman a former youth team coach at non-league Macclesfield Town in Cheshire after exploiting the teenager’s drug habit.

Sailsman who wanted free access to crack cocaine began selling drugs for Beadell and was eventually used as a hired gun to terrorise a rival small-time dealer.

Last October Sailsman was driven to the home of their target where he used a 12 gauge shotgun to pump two bullets through the front door at point range – missing a couple and two children who were inside.

Julia Howard arriving at Chester Crown Court to be sentenced for her part in the murder of Zain Sailsman

Julia Howard arriving at Chester Crown Court to be sentenced for her part in the murder of Zain Sailsman

No one was injured but the rival who was not at home at the time was terrified enough to start working for Beadell.

The gun was later hidden in woodland with the ammunition hidden in a churchyard but Sailsman dug up the weapon and secretly sold it to pay for his own drug use before fleeing to Blackpool.

Beadell later contacted Sailsman’s mother Madeline Fletcher on Facebook saying people were coming to the house as her son had ‘taken something’ from him.

Mrs Fletcher, 48, told the jury that she and her three daughters had already been threatened by her son’s criminal associates with her car and house being vandalised.

The family home was turned into a ‘fortress’ with panic alarms and a fire- and bombproof letterbox.

She said: ‘I had told Zain there was consequences to his actions. It was the way I tried to bring my kids up. They threatened they would petrol bomb the house. I was living in fear.’

Mrs Fletcher said she had been called by her son from Blackpool asking for money and added: ‘He was crying, which wasn’t like him. He admitted carrying out the shooting with Charlie. I was shocked, especially as children were in the house. I didn’t know what to do. I didn’t transfer money but said he would have to come back.

‘I tried to make him see sense about the shooting. I couldn’t believe he could stoop so low. He said it was him who pulled the trigger. No one else had the bottle to do it. I told him to turn himself in.’

Julia Howard, 36, a student forensic psychologist, who acted as the getaway driver was cleared of murder but convicted of perverting the course of justice and was jailed for three years

William Dale, 25, was jailed for 14 years after he admitted drugs and firearms offences+9

Jailed: Julia Howard, 36, a student forensic psychologist, who acted as the getaway driver was cleared of murder but convicted of perverting the course of justice and was jailed for three years; William Dale, 25, was jailed for 14 years after he admitted drugs and firearms offences

Sailsman was brought back to Macclesfield by relatives and he tried to keep a low profile but paid with his life when he agreed to meet Beadell on the pretext of recovering the shotgun and to continue working for him.

In a text exchange Sailsman asked Jervis: ‘Not a set up or anything’ and Jervis replied: ‘What are you on? You’re one of the boys, I trust you.’

Beadell, Jervis and Sailsman were later driven to the woods by Howard on October 30.

Sailsman had planned to pretend to look for the gun by a tree then feign innocence when they could not find it – not knowing Beadell was armed with a 12-inch bladed knife.

Jervis told the court: ‘Zain was digging around for a couple of minutes with his hands. He looks a bit confused, gets up, looking and Charlie gets down and starts looking.

‘How do you lose a shotgun? You don’t lose a shotgun. Someone said we should go back in the morning and look for it. Zain swore on his mother’s life that hadn’t been there or moved the gun but Charlie started raising his voice saying: “You’re saying it’s me who took it”.

Ricky Jervis was jailed for 27 years for murder

‘They carried on arguing and then Charlie lunged at Zain and came away screaming and shouting. Zain’s turned away from him and I saw the knife. He was moving the trees out the way. Charlie had the knife in his right hand. Zain ran towards the fence ‘I said stop, man, stop! Zain said, “What the f***? What’s he done that for?” I didn’t realise how badly hurt he was.

‘I said to Charlie “What the f***, he’s supposed to be your guy, you just stabbed him.” I was shocked.’

Beadell and Howard fled Macclesfield and checked into various hotels but were arrested two days later. Jervis was arrested as he was fleeing into the countryside carrying a bag containing his clothes stained in the victim’s blood.

All three denied murder. Beadell claimed Sailsman was stabbed by two drug dealers from Liverpool.

In a statement after the case, Sailsman’s family said: ‘Zain’s life has been cruelly and tragically cut short and regardless of the sentence imposed his murderers will one day walk free and be able to resume their lives. Zain will never get that opportunity. In our eyes no sentence will ever be long enough.

‘Zain’s death has ripped the heart out of our family and our lives will never be the same without him in them. Zain was no angel in life but to us he was always the little boy with the cheeky smile and the big sense of humour. He did not deserve to die the way in which he did.’

 

Ruthless commuter belt drugs kingpins murdered young hoodlum who sold shotgun they had given him to kill rival  | Mail Online.

SYTECH’s Simon Lang receives Investigative Services Award from Staffordshire Police for his Digital Forensic assistance in a Child Exploitation Case

SYTECH’s Simon Lang receives Investigative Services Award from Staffordshire Police for his Digital Forensic assistance in a Child Exploitation Case

Investigative services awards 24th March 2014

Investigative services awards 24th March 2014

 

“Paedophile tried to hide his rape victim in Hanley flat”

 

PAEDOPHILE Emlyn Francis has been locked up for 10 years after raping a child.

 

The 56-year-old former soldier – who was already a registered sex offender – subjected the girl to a campaign of sexual abuse.

 

Stoke-on-Trent Crown Court heard the victim, who was aged under 13, was assaulted over a three-year period.

 

Francis’s crimes were discovered when police found the girl at his home during a routine check.

 

Prosecutor Neil Ahuja said: “Police visited his flat as part of monitoring him as per his sex offenders registration.

 

“There was a reluctance by the defendant to open the door, he was nervous on arrival and tried to hide the girl’s presence.”

 

Following the police intervention the victim told a family member what Francis had done to her.

 

Officers seized his mobile phone and found photographs of the abuse.

 

Francis, of Linfield Road, Hanley, pleaded guilty to two counts of raping a child, and seven counts of causing or inciting a child to engage in sexual activity.

 

Mr Ahuja said: “The counts are based on a combination of the victim’s disclosures to a family member, those made during her interviews and the photographs found on his mobile phone and what they revealed.”

 

The court heard Francis was dishonourably discharged from the Army in 1990 after he sexually assaulted an 11-year-old girl.

 

In 2001, he was convicted of three counts of indecently assaulting a female under 16, and gross indecency with a child.

 

Anis Ali, representing Francis, said his client had been ‘hard-working’ for most of his life.

 

“Of late, he has lived a lonely, perhaps sad, and isolated existence without active support,” said Mr Ali.

 

“He lost the support of his wife when he was last convicted, and he has no meaningful relationship with his children, who are now adults.

 

“He accepts full responsibility for his conduct.

 

“He is able to demonstrate a level of understanding of the long-lasting consequences and the trauma that he has caused the complainant.”

 

Judge David Fletcher sentenced Francis to 10 years in prison for the two rape charges and eight years – to run concurrently – for the seven further counts, making a total of 10 years.

 

He said: “You utilised your position, as an adult in a position of power, and you also used coercion.

 

“You required her to do things and if she did them she got a reward – that’s grooming.

 

“When the victim was interviewed she found the whole experience hugely difficult.

 

“I suspect that going through life she will find the recollection of this whole set of circumstances equally difficult to deal with.

 

“Goodness knows how this is going to affect her in years to come.”


Read more: http://www.stokesentinel.co.uk/Paedophile-tried-hide-rape-victim-Hanley-flat/story-19556082-detail/story.html

 

SYTECH gain 7th place for Digital Forensics in – Tweeting Forensic Science: 100 Great Accounts Worth Investigating

 

The field of forensic science depends heavily on technology, and is subject to rapid innovation. This is especially true of digital forensics. There is a constant arms race to come up with new programs to more effectively protect and analyze data to reinforce computer security. Many top experts in forensic science, including digital forensics, crime scene investigation, and even forensic archaeology and entomology, are using Twitter to share their views and discuss innovations in the industry. Twitter is an excellent venue for newcomers and old hands in forensic science to keep up with industry news, learn about new developments, and network both socially and professionally.

 

These are some of the most informative Twitter accounts in the Forensic Science space. Following any and all of these individuals, companies, and publications is a great way to delve into the rich and ever growing field of forensic science. The accounts are classified by general subject matter, and listed in no specific order.

 

Digital Forensic Investigation Info

Digital forensic investigation is one of the most rapidly developing branches of the forensic science field. Crimes involving identity theft, financial fraud, and other digital evidence require the technical expertise of a digital forensic scientist or cybersecurity specialist. Many companies and publications have popped up specifically to cover digital forensics, and they often share their insights on Twitter.

 

@SytechForensics

@SytechForensics

Sytech Digital Forensics brings together leading-edge specialists in all areas of Digital Forensics to provide a comprehensive one-stop analysis service. They work with all sectors and have over the years been involved in thousands of cases, including several very high profile cases. Their tweets touch on such topics as criminal justice, civil litigation, corporate and individual digital forensics.

Tweeting Forensic Science: 100 Great Accounts Worth Investigating » Forensic Science Degree.

Cellebrite Research Reveals Top Trends Shaping Mobile Forensics: Multi-Device, Field Analysis, Social Evidence, Big Data (SYTECH) and Malware

Cellebrite Research Reveals Top Trends Shaping Mobile Forensics: Multi-Device, Field Analysis, Social Evidence, Big Data (SYTECH) and Malware

Industry Research Study Delivers Outlook for Mobile Forensics

 

Cellebrite surveyed its customer base and conducted interviews with leading mobile forensic experts and analysts spanning the industry. According to the research, the following trends will directly shape mobile forensics in the months to come:

  1. Consumers Increasingly Rely on Multiple Devices: Investigators are likely to find themselves analyzing data from more than one cellular phone, tablet, GPS device and other mobile media, not just per case but also per person. As a result, mobile forensic investigations have outpaced computer forensics, with the ratio increasing by as much as threefold over the past three years. “This trend shows that as mobile devices become more powerful and easier to use, more people depend on them to manage different aspects of their work and personal lives,” said Cindy Murphy, a detective with the Madison Wisconsin Police Department. “That means that investigators need ways to manage multiple sources of data to obtain a full picture of each person’s life, in the time frame that they need the information most.”
  2. Extraction and Analysis Go Local, Shifting from the Lab to the Field: Due to the rapid increase in mobile device evidence, law enforcement agencies can no longer rely solely on forensic labs at the state and federal levels. Whether as part of a search incident to arrest, the forensic preview of digital media during execution of a search warrant or a consent to search while evaluating a complaint, almost 44 percent of survey respondents now extract mobile data in the field. “Digital forensics is becoming democratized,” said D/Sgt Peter Salter of the Police Service of Northern Ireland eCrime Unit. “Specialized expertise will always be an important strategic element within overall capability to produce robust evidence for court. However, specialists and case investigators alike both benefit from having the capability to examine exhibits locally and on the frontline. Within agreed procedures, this approach enables investigators to determine which exhibits require more in-depth investigation, as well as provide frontline investigators with rapid, controlled access to digital evidence in order to inform their critical decision making.”
  3. Mobile Evidence Gets Social, Data Sources Diversify: There are approximately 1.19 billion active users on Facebook300 billion tweets sent on Twitter monthly, and 16 billion photos shared on Instagram monthly. Additionally, 2013 saw more than 100 billion downloads of mobile applications. The result? Data living in social applications has become critically important as the number of criminal investigations involving data collected from these applications rose significantly. Cellebrite’s survey revealed that 77 percent of respondents believed that mobile apps were the most critical data source, followed by the cloud at 71 percent. “Documenting different communication channels that are part of a crime (e.g., Facebook, YouTube, etc.), as well as those that can lead to new witnesses, victims, suspects and alternate perpetrators is becoming more important,” said John Carney, Chief Technology Officer at Carney Forensics. “It is necessary to contextualize mobile device data with social data from people’s online personas.”
  4. Big Data, Focused Analytics: With the amount of digital evidence growing from gigabytes to terabytes in many cases, data analytics becomes even more crucial in understanding mobile evidence. Investigators need to be able to separate relevant data from the inconsequential, and then easily understand and explain the differences to themselves, colleagues, barristers/attorneys and jurors. “The ability to visualize timelines, geographical locations, and content can make all the difference in how jurors, barristers/attorneys, and others perceive the relevance of data we extract,” said Simon Lang, Digital Forensic Manager with SYTECH.
  5. Mobile Malware Impacts Civil and Criminal Investigations: In 2013, Cellebrite’s panel of industry experts predicted a rise in mobile malware and the resulting need for forensics examiners to understand how to recognize and analyze it together with other evidence. “Malware as a factor in fraud, intimate partner abuse, theft of intellectual property and trade secrets and other crimes is something that all investigators will need to consider with every mobile device they encounter,” said Carlos Cajigas, Training Director and Senior Forensic Examiner with EPYX Forensics. “Training and practical experience are necessary to develop the level of proficiency investigators need to make these assessments.”

 

“The rise in mobile phone usage and consumer reliance on these devices has directly increased the complexity of criminal investigations,” said Ron Serber, Cellebrite co-CEO. “In order to ensure that collected mobile data translates into forensically sound evidence, awareness, education and training will be critical for the mobile forensics industry this year.”

Findings are based on a combination of survey responses and interviews with industry leaders. The following mobile forensics experts were interviewed as part of Cellebrite’s research:

  • Carlos Cajigas – Training Director and Senior Forensic Examiner, EPYX Forensics
  • John Carney – Chief Technology Officer, Carney Forensics
  • Cindy Murphy – Detective Computer Crimes/Computer Forensics, Madison Wisconsin Police Department
  • Simon Lang – Digital Forensic Manager, SYTECH
  • Peter Salter – Detective Sergeant, Police Service of Northern Ireland eCrime Unit
  • Ron Serber – Co-CEO, Cellebrite

 

To read Cellebrite’s complete industry outlook, visit: http://www.cellebrite.com/collateral/OUTLOOK_FOR_THE_MOBILE_FORENSICS_INDUSTRY_2014_WP.pdf

To learn more about Cellebrite’s mobile forensics solutions, visit: http://www.cellebrite.com/mobile-forensics.

About Cellebrite:

Founded in 1999, Cellebrite is a global company known for its technological breakthroughs in the cellular industry with dedicated operations in the United StatesGermanySingapore, and Brazil. A world leader and authority in mobile data technology, Cellebrite established its mobile forensics division in 2007, introducing a new line of products targeted to the law enforcement sector. Using advanced extraction methods and analysis techniques, Cellebrite’s Universal Forensic Extraction Device (UFED) is able to extract and analyze data from thousands of mobile devices, including feature phones, smartphones and GPS devices.  Cellebrite’s UFED is the tool of choice for thousands of forensic specialists in law enforcement, military, intelligence, security and government agencies in more than 100 countries.

Cellebrite is a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Sun Corporation, a listed Japanese company (6736/JQ).

SOURCE Cellebrite

 

Read more: http://www.digitaljournal.com/pr/1758815#ixzz2ubRZKck6

Cellebrite Research Reveals Top Trends Shaping Mobile Forensics: Multi-Device, Field Analysis, Social Evidence, Big Data and Malware – Press Release – Digital Journal.