Category Archives: CCTV

SYTECH Case (Cell-Site Analysis, GPS Forensics and Advanced Phone Forensics including “Chip-Off”) – Dale Cregan Given Whole Life Prison Sentence

A Greater Manchester Police led investigation used the help and services of SYTECH to utilise their expertise in Cell-Site Analysis, GPS Forensics and Advanced Phone Forensics including “Chip-Off” for their successful investigation and subsequent convictions.

Dale Cregan will spend the rest of his life behind bars for the murders of four people in Manchester.

Cregan, 30, admitted killing father and son David and Mark Short, and the double murder of policewomen Fiona Bone and Nicola Hughes last September, and faces the rest of his life in prison.

The ambush of the two officers was the culmination of a crime spree which began with him gunning down Mark Short as he played pool in the Cotton Tree pub in Droylsden on May 25. His father David had been the target.

Three months after the pub attack, in August 2012, he killed Mark’s father David Short, 46, in a gun and grenade assault at his home in Clayton, also in Greater Manchester.

Dale Cregan court case
A cache of weapons, including grenades, recovered after Cregan’s arrest

It ended with Cregan luring two police officers to a house with a false report of a break-in, before gunning them down in cold blood.

The judge, Mr Justice Holroyde QC, said he had “pursued them with a cold blooded determination to end their lives”.

He spoke of the “horror of bodies being disfigured by the exploding of a hand grenade”, adding that the killings were an “act of premeditated savagery”.

He told the defendants that he had seen no hint of real remorse, or compassion for the victims.

PCs Fiona Bone and Nicola Hughes
Cregan had already admitted murdering Fiona Bone and Nicola Hughes

Ahead of the sentencing, Michael Lavery, representing Cregan, said he could not make “sensible” submissions in mitigation, given the “exceptionally grave offences” his client had committed and admitted.

Nazir Afzal, chief crown prosecutor for the North West, said the killings were “nothing short of executions”.

Police commissioner Tony Lloyd said the case cast a “long, dark shadow” across the city.

Commenting on the murder of two unarmed officers, Greater Manchester chief constable Sir Peter Fahy said: “The British public prize the fact that their police force is routinely unarmed and saw this attack as an attack on all of us.”

David and Mark Short
David (L) and Mark Short were both killed by Cregan

On Thursday two other men – Luke Livesey and Damian Gorman – were found guilty of Mark Short‘s murder and the attempted murder of three people at the pub.

They were given life sentences with a minimum term of 33 years.

Jermaine Ward and Anthony Wilkinson were convicted of murdering David Short, and were given life sentences with a minimum term of 33 and 35 years respectively.

Mohammed Imran Ali, found guilty of assisting an offender, was given a seven year prison term.

Dale Cregan
Cregan had his hair and beard trimmed to look good in court

Cregan was cleared of one remaining attempted murder charge. He smiled and shook hands with the other defendants after the verdicts.

During the trial a barber told the court of his “terror” when Cregan turned up at his home the night before murdering the two police officers.

Alan Whitwell was forced to trim the hair and beard of the double-killer on the run from police, an order given by Cregan so he would look good in court.

It can also now be reported that one of the jurors trying Cregan and the others was dismissed after declaring within days that they were all “as guilty as f***”.

Dale Cregan court case
Co-accused Mohammed Ali, Jermaine Ward and Anthony Wilkinson

Cregan was subjected to twice-daily checks behind his false eye as part of the intensive security operation surrounding his trial.

He is thought to have lost his eye in a fight with police in Thailand which involved a knuckle-duster.

Around 150 officers – several armed – swamped Preston Crown Court on each day of the trial which started in February as they monitored the complex and surrounding streets.

Two snipers were positioned on the facing roof of a solicitor’s building, while a portable cabin was erected at the entrance to assist in the searching of all visitors.

The cost of the security operation topped £5m.

Dale Cregan Given Whole Life Prison Sentence.

Courtesy of DNAinfo The NYPD##Q##s Facial Recognition Unit used this photo to catch Alan Marrero, who was arrested in connection to a string of livery cab robberies. Courtesy of DNAinfo

Socializing online is landing criminals in custody.

Police are searching for suspects##Q## photos on Instagram and Facebook, then running them through the NYPD’s new Facial Recognition Unit to put a face to a name, DNAinfo New York has learned.

Detectives are now breaking cases across the city thanks to the futuristic technology that marries mug shots of known criminals with pictures gleaned from social media, surveillance cameras and anywhere else cops can find images.

High-tech NYPD Unit Tracks Criminals through Facebook and Instagram Photos | DFI News.

A sophisticated scheme to use a casino##Q##s own security systems against it has netted scammers $33m in a high-stakes poker game after they were able to gain a crucial advantage by seeing the opposition##Q##s cards.

The team used a high-rolling accomplice from overseas who was known to spend large amounts while gambling at Australia##Q##s biggest casino, the Crown in Melbourne, according to the Herald Sun. He and his family checked into the Crown and were accommodated in one of its $30,000-a-night villas.

The player then joined a private high-stakes poker game in a private suite. At the same time, an unnamed person got access to the casino##Q##s CCTV systems in the poker room and fed the information he gleaned back to the player via a wireless link. Over the course of eight hands the team fleeced the opposition to the tune of $33m.

According to a 2010 Victorian Law Reform Commission report, the Crown has one of the most sophisticated security systems in the industry. Cameras and microphones are studded throughout the casino complex and the feeds are monitored 24/7 by both the casino and staff at the Victorian Commission for Gambling Regulation.

Access to the casino##Q##s private high-stakes poker rooms is restricted to the holders of special keycards, and this is augmented by physical security on the door. These rooms also have extra surveillance, with multiple pan, tilt, and zoom cameras watching the players.

Crown Casino poker room

Cameras both obvious and otherwise. Credit: David Caird

“Crown##Q##s surveillance department recently reported concerns over a sophisticated betting scam. A Crown investigation is under way and is ongoing,” said a Crown spokesman. The company is “in a good position to recover a significant portion of the amount involved in the scam.”

“Crown has been liaising with both the police and the Victorian Commission for Gambling and Liquor Regulation regarding these matters,” he said.

There may be very little the police can do. Once the scam was uncovered the high-roller was ejected from his suite in the middle of the night and banned from any future visits. He is believed to have returned to his overseas home. The VIP handler assigned to look after him on his visit has also been fired.

It##Q##s been an expensive few days for the casino, but the Crown##Q##s hardly in financial problems. The casino gets around 30,000 visitors a day and is a top spot for high-spending Chinese gamblers. Last year it reported profits of $181m.

CCTV hack takes casino for $33 MILLION in poker losses • The Register.

Shutterstock“See! That keeps popping up on my computer!” says a blond woman as she leans back on a couch, bottle-feeding a baby on her lap.

The woman is visible from thousands of miles away on a hacker##Q##s computer. The hacker has infected her machine with a remote administration tool (RAT) that gives him access to the woman##Q##s screen, to her webcam, to her files, to her microphone. He watches her and the baby through a small control window open on his Windows PC, then he decides to have a little fun. He enters a series of shock and pornographic websites and watches them appear on the woman##Q##s computer.

The woman is startled. “Did it scare you?” she asks someone off camera. A young man steps into the webcam frame. “Yes,” he says. Both stare at the computer in horrified fascination. A picture of old naked men appears in their Web browser, then vanishes as a McAfee security product blocks a “dangerous site.”

Men Who Spy on Women through Their Webcams | DFI News.

Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance speaks at a symposium called "Cybercrime in the World Today 2013" at Pace University in Manhattan on Feb. 28, 2013. Vance said that cybercrime is the fastest growing crime trend in New York. (Joshua Philipp/The Epoch Times)

Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance speaks at a symposium called “Cybercrime in the World Today 2013” at Pace University in Manhattan on Feb. 28, 2013. Vance said that cybercrime is the fastest growing crime trend in New York. (Joshua Philipp/The Epoch Times)

You may want to think twice the next time you need money from a curbside ATM, deciding instead to pay for a meal with a credit card.NEW YORK—Prosecutions for cybercrime and identity theft in Manhattan have increased by 50 percent in the last five years, and criminals have been rigging ATM machines and scanning credit cards when no one is looking.

“Cybercrime is the fastest growing crime trend in New York, and around the country,” said Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance, during a symposium called “Cybercrime in the World Today 2013″ at Pace University on Feb. 28. “The Manhattan police precincts now record cybercrime and identity theft as their most frequently reported complaints.”

According to Vance, cybercrime is not just a growing trend—it is a fundamental shift in the way modern crime works. Modern crime has already reached a point where nearly every crime in the city involves a cybercomponent.

“It is rare that a case does not involve some kind of cyber or computer element that we prosecute in our office—whether it is homicide, whether it’s a financial crime case, whether it’s a gang case where the gang members are posting on Facebook where they’re going to meet,” said Vance.

The trend is not just small-time crooks acting on their own, either. Many local criminals are working with international hackers—often hired guns in the former Soviet Bloc who can help them con people from the other side of the world. Vance said that organized crime rings are also getting in on the game and are realizing that cybercrime is less risky—yet more lucrative—than even the drug trade.

Fighting Cybercrime

The situation is not all doom and gloom, however, and New York City is helping to lead the way in a cross-department battle against cybercrime.

“So what do we do about this, how can we stop it, what kind of recovery plans do we need to have in place?” said Pace University President Stephen Friedman during a speech at the symposium, citing recent news of cybercrime and Chinese hackers targeting U.S. critical infrastructure.

“I believe that answering those questions requires the kinds of cooperation and partnership that we see here today,” Friedman said.

The city is getting help from the Secret Service, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), local businesses, and others. This system of cooperation was actually set up in 2001 when President George W. Bush signed the USA PATRIOT Act (H.R. 3162) into law. The act established the Electronic Crime Task Forces (ECTFs) under the Secret Service.

According to the Secret Service website, “The concept of the ECTF network is to bring together not only federal, state and local law enforcement, but also prosecutors, private industry and academia.”

The panel of speakers at the Feb. 28, 2013, "Cybercrime in the World Today 2013" symposium stand for a photo. (L-R) Assistant Special Agent in Charge of the U.S. Secret Service New York Field Office Paul Mahon, Deloitte & Touche LLP Principal Kelly Bissell, Association of Chartered Certified Accountants CEO Helen Brand, Pace University Computer Information Systems Program Chair Dr. Darren Hayes, Federal Reserve Bank of New York Officer Joe Leonard, Co-founder of the Verizon Business Investigative Response Unit Christopher Novak, and Executive District Attorney and Chief of the Manhattan DA Investigation Division David Szuchman. (Joshua Philipp/The Epoch Times)

The panel of speakers at the Feb. 28, 2013, “Cybercrime in the World Today 2013” symposium stand for a photo. (L-R) Assistant Special Agent in Charge of the U.S. Secret Service New York Field Office Paul Mahon, Deloitte & Touche LLP Principal Kelly Bissell, Association of Chartered Certified Accountants CEO Helen Brand, Pace University Computer Information Systems Program Chair Dr. Darren Hayes, Federal Reserve Bank of New York Officer Joe Leonard, Co-founder of the Verizon Business Investigative Response Unit Christopher Novak, and Executive District Attorney and Chief of the Manhattan DA Investigation Division David Szuchman. (Joshua Philipp/The Epoch Times)

The basic purpose of the ECTF, it states, “is the prevention, detection, mitigation and aggressive investigation of attacks on the nation’s financial and critical infrastructures.”

Paul Mahon, assistant special agent in charge of the U.S. Secret Service New York Field Office, who moderated the Pace event, said that his office is available to help local businesses with cybersecurity.

“For private industries, the Secret Service—through DHS and through the PATRIOT Act—has been mandated to reach out to you and help in any way that we can,” Mahon said. “There’s no cost associated with it.”

“If a small company does want to talk about their security system, we can give them free advice on how to best protect [their networks],” he added.

Digital Evidence

The Manhattan District Attorney’s office also received $4.2 million last year to build a cybercrime lab. It works as the city’s crime scene investigation lab for computers, where investigators can sift through data for evidence and search hacked hard drives for digital fingerprints.

Working with digital evidence is not easy, however. Computer forensics can be even more difficult to work with than physical evidence.

“You have to prove to the court that the data hasn’t been altered, that it does stand, and the accused was the one who should be standing trial,” Mahon said. “It’s a tumultuous process.”

At the end of the day, however, cybercrime is a new field for both criminals and law enforcement. Vance said that while more crime in New York is moving to the wires, through the cooperation between businesses, academia, and local and federal law enforcement, “we are in Manhattan having a lot of success.”

He said that when most of us think of “crime scenes,” television shows like “Law and Order” may come to mind—with yellow tape and the flashing lights of police cars. “But I think we all know today, the crime scene we think of is a different type of crime scene,” he said. “And now when I look back to the 1980s, when I was an assistant DA, we could not have had a more different picture of criminal trends in Manhattan than we do today,” Vance said. “Today, it’s identity theft and cybercrime. That’s what’s happening in every neighborhood around Manhattan, and I think, around the country.”

Nearly Every NYC Crime Involves Cyber, Says Manhattan DA | New York City | United States | Epoch Times.