List of the 25 most common passwords of 2015 is now available

Every year for the past five years, Splashdata has published a list of the 25 most commonly used passwords. This list is an attempt to educate people on what’s commonly used so they can start thinking about changing passwords to something more complex and random. Sadly, after five years, not much has changed on the top 25. Below you will find the complete list of the most commonly used passwords in order of their popularity and whether it saw a growth, no change, or a reduction in popularity over the previous year’s list.

RankPasswordChange from 2014
1123456Unchanged
2passwordUnchanged
312345678Up 1
4qwertyUp 1
512345Down 2
6123456789Unchanged
7footballUp 3
81234Down 1
91234567Up 2
10baseballDown 2
11welcomeNew
121234567890New
13abc123Up 1
14111111Up 1
151qaz2wsxNew
16dragonDown 7
17masterUp 2
18monkeyDown 6
19letmeinDown 6
20loginNew
21princessNew
22qwertyuiopNew
23soloNew
24passw0rdNew
25starwarsNew

Source

 

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SYTECH Assisted Case – “‘Truly Evil’ Couple Jailed For ‘Sick’ Murder”

SYTECH received instructions from Dorset Police whom requested the Mobile Phone Forensic examinations and analysis of multiple Mobile Phone Handsets not supported for analysis via conventional forensic means and were all attributed to the below referenced murder investigation.

A “truly evil” couple who stabbed a man to death and recorded the “protracted and brutal” attack on a mobile phone have been jailed for life.

Phillip Nicholson, 22, was lured to a flat in Bournemouth where he was set upon by his ex-girlfriend, Isabella Gossling, and her new partner Richard Moors.

Gossling, 20, was found guilty of murder following a trial at Winchester Crown Court. She has been sentenced on Monday to a minimum of 19 years in jail.

Her boyfriend Richard Moors, 25, pleaded guilty to murder in a previous hearing at Portsmouth Crown Court in October.

He was sentenced on Monday to at least 22 years in jail.

Mr Nicholson, who had learning difficulties, was found dead in Gossling’s flat in the Boscombe area of the town on 26 May. He died from a stab wound to the neck.

He was enticed to her home on the pretence of meeting another girl who the couple were friends with, Winchester Crown Court heard.

But the meet-up was a lie made up by Gossling and Moors.

Once Mr Nicholson was at the flat, they stabbed him and recorded the attack on her phone, Dorset Police said.

In the audio recording, Gossling can be heard demanding an apology from Mr Nicholson for sexually assaulting her and encouraging Moors to kill him.

Police said the sex allegation was never substantiated nor reported and they believe it was unfounded.

The phone recording also captured the couple discussing how to leave Mr Nicholson’s body in a way to make it look like he stabbed himself.

The knife used to kill Mr Nicholson was found in a sink at the flat.

The court heard the couple had previously bullied and threatened their vicitm.

Detective Chief Inspector Stewart Balmer, from Dorset Police’s Major Crime Investigation Team, said: “Isabella Gossling and Richard Moors are truly evil.

“They targeted Phillip Nicholson because he was vulnerable and they could exert power over him.

“They subjected Phillip to a brutal and protracted attack.

“This is one of the most harrowing cases I have dealt with in 30 years’ service.”

He added: “The fact they chose to audio record this violent and sick act on her mobile phone is beyond belief.”

Mr Nicholson’s family said in a statement: “We are totally devastated by the way that Phillip was cruelly tormented, tortured and murdered.

“Our son was kind, caring and helpful to all and did not deserve this callous death.

“Phillip’s death will always leave a huge dent in our hearts and those of family and friends that knew him.”

 

Source:  Sky News

Unlocking the code to success – SYTECH Graduate talks about role as Digital Forensic Analyst

Matt Davies - SYTECH
Matt Davies – SYTECH
If you are interested in an exciting role at SYTECH, then please get in touch: recruitment@sytech-consultants.comor visit SYTECH Employment.

 

Matt is a graduate of the BSc (Hons) Computer Forensics course and is now working for SYTECH as a Digital Forensic Analyst.

 

Why did you decide to study computer forensics?

“I was looking for a change of career and thought computer forensics sounded very interesting. I wanted a career that was challenging and non-repetitive. During the practical tutorials in the dedicated forensic lab I began to really enjoy the topic, but when it really clicked for me was during my final year project. I became obsessed and would stay in the labs as late as I possibly could, often being asked to leave by campus security so that they could lock the building!”

Why did you decide to study at the University of South Wales?

“The University of South Wales has an outstanding reputation within the industry and I wanted to maximise the value of my degree. Had I not been able to study computer forensics at the University of South Wales, I would not have pursued a career in digital forensics.

“The University of South Wales works closely with the industry of digital forensics in creating its course content. Exposure to advanced forensic techniques such as CCTV reconstruction, forensic data recovery, and chip-off and J-TAG analysis provides students with skills vastly exceeding those of other institutions and a solid foundation upon which to build their careers.”

How did the course challenge and inspire you?

“Dr Huw Read is an excellent lecturer and instilled a new method of thinking within me. Digital forensics is about thinking outside the box, it’s looking at new devices and seeing beyond their hardware capabilities and understanding the functionalities available to the user. It’s about working around the challenges presented by security measures and providing solutions to complex problems. Trust me when I say that there is no greater feeling than that moment when you have overcome a significant challenge. Only when we push ourselves do we discover what we are truly capable of!”

Tell us a bit more about your research?

“My final year project involved creating a forensically sound method of analysing an 8th generation games console. I was given access to a dedicated postgraduate research lab and became obsessed with overcoming the challenges presented by the device. I established a method that does not alter any data during the analysis process. I was awarded a mark of 76% and invited by University lecturers to continue my research during the summer period. In October 2014, I submitted an academic paper at the Digital Forensics Research Conference (DFRWS) Europe’s largest digital forensics conference. In March of 2015, I became a published author and travelled to Ireland to present my work in front of over 200 attendees.”

What does the day-to-day role of a Digital Forensic Analyst entail?

“On a daily basis, I conduct both prosecution and defence examinations of embedded devices, such as mobile phones, tablets, Satellite Navigation Systems, games consoles, etc. The nature of the cases I am involved in range from indecent images of children to missing persons and murder investigations. The role also involves travelling around the country conducting on-site extractions of mobile devices and providing expert witness testimony in a court of law.”

How do you feel your course helped prepare you for your job at SYTECH?

“Although I enrolled on the MComp (Hons) Computer Forensics course offered by the University, I withdrew from the course early, as I was offered my position at SYTECH after graduating with the BSc (Hons) Computer Forensics. I now provide lectures at the University of South Wales to provide guidance on the skills required by industry.”

What are your next steps?

“The next step in my career is to undertake further study at the University of South Wales. I am currently in the process of preparing my PhD research proposal and aim to begin my studies in January of 2016. My aspirations are to make a significant impact in the field of digital forensics and for my name to stand for integrity, honesty and professionalism.”

What advice would you give to someone considering studying a degree?

“If you feel as though you are not ‘brainy’ enough, just remember that when I started out I didn’t have any qualifications, I was never any good in school and I’m dyslexic. Now, I’m a graduate, a published author, employed as a Digital Forensic Analyst at a fantastic organisation that believes in me and has faith in my abilities; so much so that they have offered to fund my PhD studies.”
Matt was interviewed by industry publication, Forensic Focus earlier in the year. Read the article to find out more about Matt’s research on the forensic analysis of a Sony PS4 and how he thinks the industry will evolve over the next few years.

If you are interested in an exciting role at SYTECH, then please get in touch: recruitment@sytech-consultants.com or visit SYTECH Employment.

 

Source: http://www.southwales.ac.uk/story/1995/

NSPCC – “Sexting” Awareness Campaign

‘I saw your willy’

NSPCC – Be Share Aware.

We tell our children it’s good to share – but online it’s different. In fact sometimes it can be dangerous. That’s why we’re asking parents to be Share Aware – and keep children safe online.

Find out more here: https://www.nspcc.org.uk/preventing-abuse/keeping-children-safe/share-aware

 

From Masters student to Digital Forensic Analyst

From Masters student to Digital Forensic Analyst

“My Masters helped me prepare for this role”

Rachael Medhurst graduated from the MSc Computer Forensics course and now works for SYTECH – Digital Forensics. She tells us how her course helped prepare her for her career.

“I’ve always had an interest in ICT and became particularly interested in the forensics side of computing after completing my BTEC National Diploma at college. I decided to start researching careers in the forensics field and then looked into universities that offered a forensic computing degree.

“I decided to study at the University of South Wales after attending Open Days, where I discovered they offered access to the computing equipment and labs that I was looking for, along with a supportive team of staff.

“I gained a 2:1 at degree level and then decided to take my studies a step further by completing a postgraduate course. I felt this would allow me to gain more skills and experience, such as mobile phone forensics – including chip-off forensics and malware analysis – and ultimately make me more employable. The University offered job fairs where I met ICT companies looking for forensic computing graduates, which gave me lots of information in preparation for my graduation from the course.

“There were certain aspects of the course that I found challenging and it is hard work, especially as I was working full-time alongside my studies. However, talking to lecturers about their previous experiences of forensic work, and those of the visiting professional who also came in to talk to us about their involvement in the industry was inspiring. This enabled me to remain focused, as I saw the end result that is possible if you’re prepared to work hard enough.

“I now work for SYTECH – Digital Forensics (Systems Technology Consultants) as a Graduate Digital Forensic Analyst. I’ve just completed three months training in Stoke-on-Trent and will now fulfil the rest of my role in Newport. SYTECH offer expert assistance with all technologies and work with both prosecution and defence for a range of police forces across the country.

“Throughout my time at SYTECH so far, I’ve been trained in the imaging department, where devices are checked in and then taken apart to get to the hard drive, which is imaged using FTK (Forensic Toolkit). Once the hard drives have been imaged, they are then extracted. I have also now progressed to the analysis stage, where I am able to use a range of software to analyse the hard drive. My role also involves reading through paperwork provided by the police force about cases, to gain a full understanding of the potential criminal offence. I’m looking forward to gaining further training in report writing and courtroom training next, as well as potentially completing my EnCase Certification (EnCE) with an external trainer, which is valued in this field.

“My Masters course helped me prepare for this role by enabling me to develop further skills that I feel helped me to stand out at interview. In particular, my experience on the course with imaging, the use of industry software such as FTK and EnCase, plus the ability to maintain the integrity of hard drives by following the correct policies and procedures.”

Rachael Medhurst - SYTECH

Rachael Medhurst – SYTECH

http://www.southwales.ac.uk/story/1903/

 

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